Mistweaver

Age of Darkness
(Golden Lake Productions)
Enslain Magazine Volume 2, Issue 1
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"Age of Darkness' is the fourth release from Spanish metallers Mistweaver. It begins with a rich, majestic intro, foreshadowing the mood that will be present throughout the remainder of the record. It takes a few minutes for their full sound to kick in, but when it does it is very melodic and medieval, with a fantasy sort of sound. The keyboards are the element that keep the majestic nature of the songs consistent with their high-octaved synth sound, often resembling that of Nightwish/Children of Bodom in tone. On the other hand, the guitars manage to vary the sound, incorporating death metal riffs along with some heavy metal guitar solos and power metal harmonies. The majority of the guitarwork is just fast and melodic, as lively melodies swirl with the symphonic keyboards to create a beautifully eloquent sound. Periods of double-bass and galloping riffs balance the melodies by keeping the album extreme and heavy.

Raul 'The Weaver' growls in a low-mid range, often heavily distorted. At other times you will hear folky clean vocals or muffled yells. Female vocals make minimal appearances, usually during the accoustic passages. The lyrical content doesn't deal with the expected fantasy topics, instead he sings inquiries of God and Satan, good and evil, life and death.

It is difficult to draw direct comparisons to other artists. Although many influences are noted, the overall sound is not duplicated. The intro and verses from "Baneful Winds" remind me of Godgory with it's individual note acoustics and deep, whispered vocals. Later the song smoothly incorporates some Spanish-guitar sounds. The sound on the record is never harsh, and always very polished. This clean and vibrant production can be attributed to the mastering at Finnvox. The layout design is also very clean and artful, completing the package nicely. Mistweaver has a lot to offer, and "Age of Darkness" is worth checking out. There are no immediate hooks, but with enough listens, these songs will really grow on you. --
Lady Enslain

ENSLAIN MAGAZINE