KRUK

Drowned in a SwampHeart of Evrope
(Possession Productions/Stygian Productions)
Enslain Magazine Volume 2, Issue 1
Order Issue #8!  This review included.
This is not a new record from the band, but their first two records put together under a new title. This is a treat, since it means 17 tracks of some very brooding and dark metal! The first thing I notice is distorted bass guitar! Not too common really, but here it adds a great amount of sinister tone to the record, in addition to the already tone-saturated guitars. The first nine tracks (one of the two records here, but am not certain of their chronological order) tend to be very straightforward for the most part, utilizing a mix of either full power chords or single notes played very fast. Often times there are also slow, haunting riffs, such as the instrumental 2nd half of "Akanavany" (including some synth, which is more in use on the last half of the record), and the mid-section of "Gardar." There are also the mid-temp march-feel sections (mosh-time!) to round everything out dynamically.

The vocals of Ryks Asirg (also on Bass) are ominous, with a mid to high range tone, but mostly mid, in the black metal style. There is some slight reverb on them for a good effect, but during the faster passages the vocals are slightly less prominent. There is no mention of a drummer in the liner notes, but with the tones of the drums, it is a safe bet that the drums were programmed. Even still, they sound closer to live drums than would be expected, without sounding too mechanical or dull.

Tracks 10-17 begin with the doom-laden "Szaljonaja Beizlicz", with its low bass strings on synth. This set of tracks feature vocalizations attributed to Great Marsh and Stalin I.V. They are not sung in the way tracks 1-9 are, but are more like harsh and poignant declarations. The vibe on this set of tracks differs slightly from the first; it is bit more raw and scratchy. I find them to be darker, since they include more synth to add depth.

Kruk creates distinct moods with their music, with its mixture of melancholy observances of life, and staunch patriotism. This is definitely worth checking out. --
Richard

ENSLAIN MAGAZINE